CORRECTION to June 16 story about executive order on masks, vaccinations

EDS: Clients who used a Cronkite News story slugged BC-CNS ASU Masks that moved Wednesday, June 16, under a TEMPE dateline, are asked to run the following correction. The error occurred in the 2nd graph of the original story. A corrected version of the story has been posted here.

TEMPE– A June 16 Cronkite News story on Arizona State University students’ reactions to Gov. Doug Ducey’s executive order blocking mask and vaccination policies misstated ASU’s guidance to students in the fall. The email said the university has an “expectation that all students enrolled in an on-campus academic program for 2021-22 will be vaccinated.”

Arizona’s ‘Hip Historian’ makes impact on Arizona’s transgender history

  • Slug: BC-CNS-Gender Pioneer, 1,100 words
  • Video available here
  • 3 photos available (thumbnails, captions below)

By Katelyn Keenehan
Cronkite News

PHOENIX – Arizona’s Hip Historian Marshall Shore is known for his vivid storytelling, a cult-like following and expertise on the state’s history.

From his regular Arizona History Happy Hour to his ghost tours of the Valley, Shore has become a local celebrity. Part of the appeal is his study of under-represented groups and his interest in rewriting history with equity in mind.

Through the support of his followers, Shore was able to raise funds to purchase a headstone for a transgender man who was buried without one in the early 1900s.

The Greenwood Memory Lawn Mortuary & Cemetery in Phoenix opened in 1906 and holds the remains of some of the people who defined Arizona, including John T. Alsap, Phoenix’s first mayor, and William S. Hancock, who laid out the Phoenix town site, according to the Arizona Republic. It also has been the site of controversy, including a movement to remove a Confederate veterans memorial.

Continue reading “Arizona’s ‘Hip Historian’ makes impact on Arizona’s transgender history”

CORRECTION to May 14 story on Filipino nurse deaths

EDS: Clients who used a Cronkite News story slugged “CNS-Filipino Nurses” that moved Friday, May 14, under a PHOENIX dateline are asked to run the following correction. The error occurred in the second graf of the original. A corrected version of the story has been posted here.

PHOENIX – A May 14 Cronkite News story about Filipino nurses and COVID-19 misstated the percent of registered nurses of color who had died from COVID-19 and related complications. National Nurses United, which conducted the analysis, found that among registered nurses who had died, 57.7% of the deaths were nurses of color.

Lost on the front lines: Health care workers in Southwest who died fighting COVID-19

  • Slug: BC-CNS BC-CNS Frontline Faces, 2,600 words.
  • Photos and captions below.

By Cronkite News staff

Health care workers across the country have risked their lives to care for COVID-19 patients, and Cronkite News reporters teamed up with the Guardian and Kaiser Health News to tell some of the stories of those who died because of exposure to the novel coronavirus that causes the deadly disease.

The overall project was awarded the Batten Medal for Coverage of the Coronavirus Pandemic on Monday. Here are Cronkite News’ contributions to the extensive database that gathered more than 3,600 obituaries of health care workers.

Continue reading “Lost on the front lines: Health care workers in Southwest who died fighting COVID-19”

CORRECTION to March 19 story on racism and violence against Asians

EDS: Clients who used a Cronkite News story slugged BC-CNS Asian American Violence that moved Friday, March 19, under a PHOENIX dateline are asked to run the following correction. The error occurred in the 17th graf of the original. A corrected version of the story has been posted here.

PHOENIX – A March 19 Cronkite News story about racism and violence against Asian Americans incorrectly identified the group hosting a candlelight vigil at the state Capitol on March 19. The Arizona Asian American Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander for Equity Coalition, a community group that describes its goal as “working to include the Pan-Asian and other marginalized communities in the decision making process,” hosted the vigil.

CORRECTION to March 5 story on a veteran flight

EDS: Clients who used a Cronkite News story slugged BC-CNS Veteran Flights that moved Friday, March 5, under a MESA dateline are asked to run the following correction. The error occurred in the 5th graf of the original and in a caption with a tight shot of Norman Langeliers. A corrected version of the story and photo caption has been posted here.

MESA – A March 5 Cronkite News story contained inaccurate information about World War II veteran Norman Langeliers’ military service, which was provided by the nonprofit that organized the flight. Langeliers says he was an engineer on the USS Bracken. Continue reading “CORRECTION to March 5 story on a veteran flight”

Racial equity is key to helping homeless during the pandemic

  • Slug: BC-CNS-Racial Equity,1020
  • 1 photo available (thumbnail, caption below)

By Chloe Jones and Anne Mickey
Howard Center for Investigative Journalism

The Department of Housing and Urban Development and leading national experts have said racial equity should be at the center of homeless responses during the COVID-19 pandemic — a recognition that people of color are disproportionately affected by both homelessness and the coronavirus. Here’s a look at the issues.

What is racial equity? 

Racial equity is not the same as racial equality. HUD addressed this distinction in June when it issued guidance to nonprofits working with homeless populations during the pandemic. Equality means treating everyone the same and ensuring they have access to the same opportunities. But with historic and structural racism, equal access doesn’t always mean equal results. Only equity addresses those differences. Continue reading “Racial equity is key to helping homeless during the pandemic”

Puerto Rico’s nonprofits fear history repeating itself in homeless aid

  • Slug: BC-CNS-Homeless Funding Territories,1800
  • 2 photos available, thumbnails and captions available below

By Lidia Terrazas and Molly Bohannon
Howard Center for Investigative Journalism

Since the coronavirus pandemic hit Puerto Rico in March, many homeless relief organizations have been scrambling to meet the basic needs of the island’s homeless population because the majority of federal homeless aid that was allocated has not yet reached them.

Given the territory’s record of mismanaging disaster relief, homeless assistance and community development funds, fears are mounting that history may be repeating itself.

Under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act passed in March, Puerto Rico was entitled to just over $39 million to help protect and shelter its homeless population during the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly 70% of that total, or some $27 million, is supposed to be earmarked for smaller or rural communities, where a substantial portion of islanders are homeless.

Puerto Rico officials didn’t tap the majority of their CARES Act funding until Oct. 27, according to an analysis of government spending data by the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism. That same month, territory leaders met with HUD officials concerned about Puerto Rico’s ability to successfully manage the unprecedented amount of aid. The $4 billion in homeless aid included in the CARES Act is about 14 times greater than the amount in last year’s Emergency Solutions Grants program. Grant recipients must have a HUD-approved use plan before accessing any of the aid money.

Continue reading “Puerto Rico’s nonprofits fear history repeating itself in homeless aid”

Two cities tried to fix homelessness, only one succeeded

  • Slug: BC-CNS-Homeless Funding – Houston, San Diego, 3000
  • 9 photos available (thumbnails and captions available below)
  • 1 data visualization available here

By Audrey Jensen, Jill Ryan, Chloe Jones and Madeline Ackley
Howard Center for Investigative Journalism

HOUSTON — Nearly a decade ago, two U.S. cities with large homeless populations tried to solve their problem by adopting a strategy that prioritized giving people housing and help over temporary shelter.

But Houston and San Diego took fundamentally different approaches to implementing that strategy, known as Housing First. Houston revamped its entire system to get more people into housing quickly, and it cut homelessness by more than half. San Diego attempted a series of one-off projects but was unable to expand the lessons learned and saw far fewer reductions in homelessness.

Despite those outcomes, the cities are again charting different paths in deciding how to use millions in taxpayer money that Congress approved to care for the homeless as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act.

Each city has been allocated more than $26 million in federal emergency funds to protect and house their homeless populations, among the most vulnerable to the coronavirus. In keeping with Housing First, Houston is focusing much of its unprecedented amount of aid on permanent housing and homeless prevention. San Diego, with its chronic shortage of affordable housing, is prioritizing temporary shelters.

Continue reading “Two cities tried to fix homelessness, only one succeeded”

Federal aid divides homeless in the Twin Cities

  • Slug: BC-CNS-Homeless Funding – Twin Cities, 2400
  • 7 photos available (thumbnails and captions available below)
  • 4 data visualizations available (embed codes below)

By Helen Wieffering, Agya K. Aning and Helena Wegner
Howard Center for Investigative Journalism

ST. PAUL, Minnesota – In two rooms in separate cities, people say their names. Around a circle of chairs and tables, they gather weekly to strategize leaving the streets behind. All have been homeless before or are living on the brink.

The conversation is more urgent, as a pandemic winter sets in. And frustration is building with public leaders who they feel have not done enough to help.

The Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, though similar in many ways, have taken opposite approaches to tapping the largest homeless aid package in American history.

Congress included $4 billion for emergency homeless aid in its pandemic relief bill last spring. Officials in Minneapolis and surrounding Hennepin County moved quickly to use the $17.5 million granted them under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act. But St. Paul and surrounding Ramsey County officials have yet to touch the nearly $8 million in homeless funding they were allocated. As of early December, they had not even finalized plans for how the money would be used.

Continue reading “Federal aid divides homeless in the Twin Cities”

Calculating the impact of HUD’s homeless formulas

  • Slug: BC-CNS-Homeless Funding Formula,2400
  • 2 photos available (thumbnails and captions available below)
  • Two graphic available (embed codes below)

By Andy Blye and Austin Fast
Howard Center for Investigative Journalism

Eric Smith will finally have a place to call home after years of sleeping in his car and on his aunt’s sofa because of an obscure change in how the federal government calculates homeless aid.

For decades, Washington has determined how much taxpayer money to give states, counties and cities for their homeless residents, using a formula that actually has nothing to do with homelessness. But the COVID-19 pandemic, and its billions in emergency aid, forced lawmakers to rework the old, politically popular homeless formula, which spread the wealth regardless of need.

In Los Angeles, the change has meant nearly $120 million more in aid and a chance for Smith and thousands like him to fundamentally change their lives. Continue reading “Calculating the impact of HUD’s homeless formulas”

Communities struggle to make best use of COVID homeless aid

  • Slug: BC-CNS-Homeless Funding Communities,3300
  • 6 photos available, thumbnails and captions available below
  • Time-lapse video available, embed code available at bottom of story

By Shaena Montanari and Natalie Walters
Howard Center for Investigative Journalism

Winter in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge is wet and freezing, a life-threatening situation for the area’s homeless residents even without a pandemic. Darcy Long-Curtiss understands that better than most.

The shelter that normally provided nighttime refuge was closed because of COVID-19, and federal aid money meant to help protect homeless people from the pandemic came late and with confusing restrictions. By the time Long-Curtiss got permission to erect temporary shelters purchased with her community’s share of the funding, temperatures were already dipping below freezing. She had just one week to ready the site and make potentially life-and-death decisions.

“I have to find out who doesn’t have any other option, who would be most likely to have frostbite or die if they didn’t get a shelter and then go from there,” said Long-Curtiss, a councilwoman in The Dalles, a city of about 16,000 at the eastern edge of the gorge. “But those are incredibly difficult decisions to make when you know everybody personally.”

The challenge facing the small homeless community in The Dalles is a microcosm of the difficulty faced by homeless service providers nationwide as they rush against winter to figure how to use the largest influx of homeless aid in American history.

Continue reading “Communities struggle to make best use of COVID homeless aid”

CORRECTIONS to Nov. 16 and Nov. 20 California sports stories

EDS: Clients who used Cronkite News stories slugged BC-CNS California Multisport Choice that moved Nov. 16 under an Anaheim, California, dateline and/or Sports-California Interstate Athletes that moved Nov. 20 under a San Clemente, California, dateline are asked to run the following correction. The error occurred on first reference to the group Next College Student Athlete. Corrected versions of the stories have been posted here for the Nov. 16 story and here for the Nov. 20 story.  

Two Cronkite News stories – one that published Nov. 16 about California athletes forced to make choices about their futures and another that published Nov. 20 about California athletes traveling to Arizona to play – incorrectly pluralized the name of the group Next College Student Athlete.

CORRECTION to Oct. 7 story on COVID in ICE detention facilities

EDS: Clients who used a Cronkite News story slugged CNS-LaPalma-COVID-19 that moved Wednesday, Oct. 7, under a PHOENIX dateline are asked to run the following correction. The error occurred in the second graf of the original story. The changes make clear the numbers used are cumulative numbers, not “active” cases as the original article stated. Additional clarifications have been added throughout the story. A corrected version of the story has been posted here.

PHOENIX – An Oct. 7 Cronkite News story on La Palma Correctional Center, a privately run immigration detention center in Eloy, mischaracterized the status of COVID-19 cases in the facility. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement reported 400 cumulative cases as of Oct. 7. The agency reported 26 confirmed active cases.

CORRECTION to July 17 story about voting precautions

EDS: Clients who used a Cronkite News story slugged BC-CNS COVID and Voting that moved Friday, July 17, under a PHOENIX dateline are asked to run the following correction. The error occurred in the eight and 13th grafs of the original story. A corrected version of the story has been posted here.

PHOENIX – A July 17 Cronkite News story about voting misspelled the name of Erika Flores, deputy director of communications for the Maricopa County Elections Department. The article also incorrectly states precautions elections officials are taking at the vote centers. The county will only require masks and daily temperature checks for staff and visitors at the Maricopa County Tabulation and Election Center. At voting centers, poll workers will wear gloves, masks and face shields; the county will offer masks and gloves to voters, but officials will not require them for voters.

CORRECTION to Feb. 27 story about Maricopa County elections

EDS: Clients who used a Cronkite News story slugged BC-CNS-Maricopa County Elections that moved Thursday, Feb. 27, under a PHOENIX dateline, are asked to run the following correction. The errors occurred in the third and sixth grafs of the original. A new third graf has been inserted. A corrected version of the story has been posted here.

PHOENIX – A Feb. 27 Cronkite News article incorrectly reported the number of polling locations in Maricopa County for the Presidential Preference Election. The county has 229. The story also incorrectly stated when Maricopa County received the new voting tabulation equipment. It was before SB 1135 was passed.

CORRECTION to Feb. 25 story on transgender ICE detainees

EDS: Clients who used a Cronkite News story slugged BC-CNS ICE Transgender Detainees that moved Tuesday, Feb. 25, under a PHOENIX dateline, are asked to use the following correction. The error occurred in the 14th graf of the original. That sentence has been removed. A corrected version of the story has been posted here.

PHOENIX – A Feb. 25 Cronkite News article about transgender migrant detainees at the Cibola County Correctional Center misattributed information to Allegra Love of the Santa Fe Dreamers Project about the role the center played in the May 25, 2018, death of a former detainee. An autopsy by the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator found that the woman’s death was natural.

Kobe and Gianna Bryant mourned by players and fans at memorial in Los Angeles

  • Slug: BC-CNS-Kobe Memorial, 440

By Valerie Gonzales
Cronkite News

LOS ANGELES — Around 20,000 fans, celebrities, players and legends of the NBA gathered Monday to celebrate the lives of Kobe and Gianna Bryant, who were killed along with seven others in a helicopter crash Jan. 27.

At the Staples Center, where the former Laker’s number 8 and 24 jerseys hang in the rafters, host Jimmy Kimmel named cities from Boston to Phoenix while noting that even in “places where Kobe would be booed on the court, he’s missed.”

Among players in attendance to honor the five-time NBA champ were fellow former Lakers Magic Johnson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Rick Fox and Shaquille O’Neal. Many players wore sunglasses indoors at the emotional event that also drew celebrities like J-Lo, Kanye and the Kardashians. Kobe’s rivals also paid their respects, including former Phoenix Sun Steve Nash who was drafted in the same year.

Vanessa Bryant and leading players in basketball spoke, including WNBA Phoenix Mercury player Diana Taurasi, who is also known as the “White Mamba.”

Continue reading “Kobe and Gianna Bryant mourned by players and fans at memorial in Los Angeles”

CORRECTION to Feb. 12 story on proposed transgender sports bill

EDS: Clients who used a Cronkite News story slugged Protest Transgender Bill that moved Wednesday, Feb. 12, under a PHOENIX dateline, are asked to run the following correction. The error occurred in the fourth graf of the original. A corrected version of the story has been posted here.

PHOENIX– A Feb. 12 Cronkite News story about a bill that would ban female transgender students from competing in female sports incorrectly described the word cisgender. Cisgender refers to someone whose gender identity matches their sex assigned at birth, according to Phoenix nonprofit one-n-ten.

Cronkite News Español

Saludos estimados colegas:

Como les he mencionado vía telefónica o por correo electrónico, Cronkite Noticias estará enviándoles contenido en español, el cual pueden utilizar completamente gratis en sus diferentes plataformas. Dicho contenido será enviado frecuentemente, lo cual pudiera ser dos veces a la semana, todo depende del material que tengamos disponibles.

Muchas gracias por trabajar con nosotros y darnos la oportunidad de que nuestras historias estén disponibles en sus medios de comunicación.

Aquí encontrarán un listado de las historias de Cronkite Noticias del día 7 de noviembre de 2019. Si tiene alguna pregunta sobre algún reportaje en texto o para televisión, por favor comuníquese con Julio Cisneros al teléfono 775-335-5492 o julio.cisneros@asu.edu. Continue reading “Cronkite News Español”