Cronkite News Digest for Tuesday, Aug. 16

Here is your Cronkite News lineup for Tuesday, Aug. 16. If you have questions on news stories from the Phoenix bureau, please contact Managing Editor for Digital Julia Thompson at 602-543-4610 or julia.thompson.1@asu.edu, while questions about stories from our Washington bureau should go to Steve Crane at 202-684-2398 or steve.crane@asu.edu. Sports story questions can be directed to Paola Boivin at paola.boivin@asu.edu. Clients who want to use Cronkite videos can find clean versions, and scripts, for download in a Dropbox – if interested, contact Managing Editor for Broadcast/Executive Producer Heather Dunn at 602-430-8764 or at  hdunn4@asu.edu for access. Stories promised for today, along with photos and links to multimedia elements, will post to our client site at cronkitenews.jmc.asu.edu/clients.

TODAY’S NEWS

‘Growing up in trauma’: Young migrants in Tapachula cling to fragments of childhood

TAPACHULA, Mexico – Of the thousands of migrants who pass through Mexican shelters each year, at least 1 in 3 are children. Children and teenagers are fleeing north in droves, from a host of other countries. Some come with extended families or older siblings. Others travel with friends, but at least half attempt the journey alone, according to UNICEF. Young migrants live in stark conditions in Tapachula – where all migrants must wait weeks or months for documents allowing them to continue heading north.

Slug: BC-CNS Tapachula Child Migrants, 2,875 words. By Natalie Skowlund.

11 photos and 1 audio story available.

Young in age, old from experience: Children waiting in Tapachula

TAPACHULA, Mexico – A photographic essay on the plight of child migrants waiting for documents allowing them to continue their journeys north.

Slug: BC-CNS Tapachula Photo Essay, 50 words. By Tirzah Christopher.

12 B&W photos available.

SPORTS

Qatar’s laws, customs raise questions for fans attending 2022 World Cup

PHOENIX – As Qatar prepares for the 2022 World Cup in November, fans visiting from other countries are being reminded to pay attention to laws and customs in the Arab nation. “There are publicly reported stuff online on Westerners that are jailed for things like public intoxication, even just drinking, because it’s only legal in certain parts (of Qatar). …  And also, Westerners that get jailed for having sex or kissing and things like that,” said Ken Klippenstein, a D.C.-based investigative reporter for The Intercept.

Slug: Sports-Qatar World Cup Concerns. About 800 words. By Alex Amado.

File photo available.

THE WEEK’S NEWS

Tribal boarding schools much improved, but legacy of old schools remains

WASHINGTON – Pope Francis apologized. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland called it a “heartbreaking” part of U.S. history. Congress is considering legislation to atone for the government’s actions. Few dispute that Indian boarding schools led to more than a century of abuse. While that abuse was in the past, the schools are not – entirely. Arizona, home to 47 federal Indian boarding schools at one point, second-most in the nation, still has eight such schools today. Advocates say that while the modern schools are not perfect, they are a far cry from the horrors of the past.

Slug: BC-CNS-Tribal Schools. 980 words. By Morgan Fischer.

4 file photos, map available.

Capitalizing on capital’s draw, street vendors peddle to protests, tours

WASHINGTON – Political rallies here almost always feature signs and speeches and chanting. There is often heated arguing between camps. Sometimes there’s singing, sometimes there’s praying. And in the heat of a Washington summer, there’s almost always the upbeat, repetitive chiming of an ice cream truck. Whether it’s someone selling icy bottles of water out of a cooler in the summer, or peddling hats and T-shirts in the winter, when political movements come to Washington they are invariably trailed by a local army of vendors who capitalize on the protesters’ need for food, water and souvenirs.

Slug: BC-CNS-Protest Pros. 1,230 words. By Neetish Basnet.

8 photos, audio story available.

THE WEEK IN SPORTS

Since 1980, Horizon volleyball coach Valorie McKenzie has thrived in an evolving sports landscape

PHOENIX – Forty-two years ago in 1980, Ronald Reagan won the presidential election by a landslide with 489 electoral votes. “The Shining,” “Friday the 13th” and “Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back” hit the silver screen during the same year. And Valorie McKenzie became the volleyball coach at Horizon High School. Spanning four decades, McKenzie has led Horizon to four state championship wins, won multiple Coach of the Year awards and earned 1,000 wins amid a drastically changing high school sports landscape.

Slug: Sports-42-year Volleyball Coach. 2,268 words. By David Rodish.

2 photos available.

Olympic gold medalist Sydney Leroux redefines soccer moms across pro sports

LOS ANGELES – Angel City FC had just finished a big victory against the rival San Diego Wave and forward Sydney Leroux celebrated on the field. In the middle of the excitement were her two smiling children, who came on the pitch for hugs. Cassius, 5, and Roux, 3, embraced their star mom in what has become a regular postgame ritual. An alumni of Sereno Soccer Club and Horizon High, Leroux now lives as a single mom in Los Angeles – where the Surrey native knew her children would have to adjust in a new environment after a trade from the Orlando Pride in June. Luckily, finding new  playground buddies carries a similar approach to life as a professional soccer player.

Slug: Sports-Soccer Mom. 614 words. By Victoria Samuels.

Photo, video available.

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